Thursday, April 13, 2017

A Garden in Spring (The other plants)

So many interesting shapes, textures, and colors!
 
Bleeding Heart leaves with dew
 
 

Coral Bells 


Coral Bells with sunlight
 
 
Sedum
 
 
Rhubarb leaves, unfurling
 
 
Old fungus on a dead log
 

A tangle of Daylily leaves  (These plants will survive anything!)
 
 
New Peony shoots coming up from the ground
 

up-close


Leaf unrolling

 
Iris leaves, standing at attention
 
 
Hostas, unrolling their leaves
 
 
Hostas backlit by sunlight (white-edged hostas look great in shady corners)
 
 
Lilac buds
 
 
Growing Lilac tips (the ones the deer didn't munch on)
(Stupid deer!)
 
 
 
New Rose leaves (this picture makes me dizzy)

 

Crabapple leaves and buds


Bleeding Heart beginning to bloom


Rain on Bleeding Heart leaves


 Up-close hearts
 
 
First one to bloom
 

Creeping Charlie, my nemesis, in the raspberry bed 
(Cute purple flowers, but it's the plant-equivalent of "rude people": no respect for boundaries and no understanding of when it's not welcome!)
 
 
Violets, my husband's nemesis
(These plants will punch up through layers of cardboard and mulch that we lay on the garden paths.  True survivors!  It's actually kinda admirable.  I don't mind them too much, though, because they at least remain in nice, tight little bundles, instead of scrambling up and over everything like Creeping Charlie.)
 
 
My wonderful Rhubarb, taken as root cuttings from my Grandma Leonette's garden in Iowa.  Already growing tall and strong.
 
 
 Rhubarb leaf bursting from the ground (I've always thought this looked kinda obscene and grotesque, like an alien head bursting from a body or . . . well . . . I won't mention the other things it reminds me of.)
 
 
 New Black Raspberry leaves
I've always loved the shiny texture of raspberry leaves (though you can't see it in these shady pictures.)  And I totally recommend black raspberries over red ones.  Not only do they taste better, but they are much more well-behaved plants than the naughty red raspberries which spread from their roots, popping up 8 feet away from where you planted them.

 

 Future Red Currant fruit 


And one of my favorite spring sights: the blooming Nanking Cherry shrub
 
 


So enchanting!  And the bees love it, too

 

No comments:

Post a Comment

Feel free to share your comments, questions, and tips here. But keep it polite and respectful. I won't post angry diatribes or disrespectful comments or clearly immoral things.